Changing quarterbacks is a gamble for the Titans

So Bud Adams wants Vince Young to be his starting quarterback. He’s the owner and that’s certainly his prerogative. The players are his toys and he can play with them however he wants, within the guidelines of the collective bargaining agreement.
Adams doesn’t often interfere with his coaches or GMs. He’s hired football people to run his team for him, just like he’s hired people to run his other companies. Bud’s not a micromanager or a meddler, like some owners. Al Davis, Daniel Snyder and Jerry Jones spring to mind.
Of course, there are times when Adams does get involved. It was Bud’s decision to draft Steve McNair in 1995 and to select Young in 2006, both with the third overall pick. It was also his decision to start Young in Week Four of Vince’s rookie campaign. It now looks like he’s making another executive decision.
Here’s the part I fail to understand. I don’t get this talk about starting Vince just to find out what the Titans have got in him.
This is Young’s fourth year in the league and the Titans know exactly what they’ve got in him. If they don’t know that by now then that doesn’t say much for Jeff Fisher, Mike Heimerdinger, Craig Johnson or Mike Reinfeldt or for their ability to evaluate their own personnel.
It’s a gamble to change quarterbacks. How will the team respond? Which way will the players go?
For those players who believe Kerry Collins gives the Titans the best chance to win, replacing him is a signal that ownership and management have abandoned all hope for this season. Some of them may just start going through the motions, waiting for the season to end, the same way some on the 2005 team quit.
For those players who believe Vince Young gives the Titans the best chance to win, it could be the spark that’s needed to get back on track.
I’m all for the change if that’s what it takes to shake things up. Maybe the line will start blocking better, the receivers will stop dropping passes and the backs will stop fumbling.
Who knows, maybe the shakeup will transcend to the other side of the ball. Let’s see if it generates a stronger pass rush and if the safeties can cover anybody.
Note: Some of our major technical problems have now been resolved. You’re now able once again to comment on our articles and the direct links to them are working again. Thanks for bearing with us through this transition. We plan to continue providing you with quality, original content on a consistent, ongoing basis.
Quantcast